To be a truck driver is more complicated nowadays than ten years ago. The innovation is faster than ever in the transport industry. The constructors are introducing new technology almost every day. The digital world moved to the trucks and brought new challenges for drivers, owners, and trainers too. Of course, the legal environment tries to catch up. Where are the limits? What can we expect from a truck driver? Where is the balance between lack of drivers and the need for well-trained employees?

DGSA, ADR , IMDG , ICAO, IATA, Dangerous Goods Safety Adviser , Hazload , Audit , Analysis , Training

Dangerous Goods Transport is my cup of tea, but I can mention different topics as tachograph or CPC too. More and more complaints show up on various forums about how hard to pass tests, and how useless the courses are. The more complicated new technologies and chemicals the more complicated legislation.

ADR , IMDG , ICAO, IATA, Dangerous Goods Safety Adviser , Hazload , Tachograph , Analysis , DGSA , 561/2006 , AETR , Training

In my humble opinion, we have two option.

The first one drives nowhere, and this is what happens now. We try to force drivers to get more useless knowledge and pass idiot tests provided by incompetent trainers because this is the most economical solution for everybody except people behind the wheel.  Here is a couple of evidence:

Driver with valid CPC card asks me how to put the driver card into the digital tachograph. (Has anybody considered about why digital tachograph handling and ADR general awareness courses are not part of  the CPC training?)

Drivers with fresh ADR licence has no clue how to use the dangerous goods list because the trainer couldn’t to explain it.

Hazchem trained drivers are not familiar with new regulations as ADR changing in every second year but the dangerous goods licence is valid for five years, and nobody cares to inform these people.

The driver applied a regulation (561/2006EU) in the wrong way. It finally turned out the book he used for learning was completely wrong.

And so on.

DGSA, ADR , IMDG , ICAO, IATA, Dangerous Goods Safety Adviser , Hazload , Tachograph , Analysis , 561/2006 , AETR , Training

Let’s take a look at the other option. I think the only way to solve this problem is to take more pressure off the drivers and get more experts involved in the industry. In the meantime, we also need to renew the whole education system. Inevitable to simplify the syllabus and keep only the most important subjects but at the same time we have to transfer this minimised knowledge professionally.

DGSA, ADR , IMDG , ICAO, IATA, Dangerous Goods Safety Adviser , Hazload , Tachograph , Analysis , 561/2006 , AETR , Training

It takes money and energy. And not the driver’s money but the operators. And I know they won’t be happy. They have enough headache and costs. But, think about it. Is there any other way to make this job attractive?

 

Drivers, Operators, Transport Planners!!! Join to our brand new closed facebook group for free. We have experts in the following topics ADR, IMDG, TACHOGRAPH, LOAD SECURITY, TRACKING SYSTEM, REMOTE DOWNLOAD. Our experts respond to every question. Click here now.

DGSA, ADR , IMDG , ICAO, IATA, Dangerous Goods Safety Adviser , Hazload , Audit , Analysis , Training  Transportinfo. Experts in the Transport Industry

 

ADR , IMDG , ICAO, IATA, Dangerous Goods Safety Adviser , Hazload , Tachograph , Analysis , DGSA , 561/2006 , AETR , Training